And more…

BIG BAD LIST OF EMERGING ILLUSTRATORS, DESIGNERS AND VISUAL ARTISTS FROM BANGALORE

Fantastic collection of Bangalore’s most talented…

Cupick.com Projekt

“There is no line between fine art and illustration; there is no high or low art; there is only art, and it comes in many forms.” – James Gurney

Art in India is gaining new forms.It’s the beginning of a period of metamorphosis. At the helm of this change are many a talented artists determined to make their mark and to boldly go where no man has gone before. With social media taking art to a wider audience, artists are being imparted recognition resulting in a welcome shift in the popular art scene.

We wanted to explore the rising talent across India and so we have compiled a list of upcoming artists, starting from Bangalore. (This list is no particular order and may not be exhaustive.)


                                               …

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Protecting the Ocean – Saving Lives

Lots of work to do – lets get to it!

Temple Adventures

The signal is given by our dive leader to start going down. One by one, we ‘Ok the line’ and start descending towards Temple. The visibility is a clear 15m+, with the divers veering off the line at the first sight of the buoys hovering over the reef. I had some slight trouble equalising and was more than happy to pull myself down the line. As I prepared to overtake the buoy, entangled in the descent line, I saw something wiggling out of the corner of my eye. There was a small blue fish, trying to break free from a net. Fishing out my knife I swiftly, yet carefully cut away the net and let the poor fellow go free.

-Images from a fish rescue by Jonah at Danny’s Eel Garden

This is something we witness once every 2-3 dives, where the horrors of modern day fishing do not stop…

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Progress at Morattandi site

imago

Concreting of roof slab about to begin… The shell is almost finished!

IMG_20150309_082003IMG_20150309_081945  IMG_20150309_0820462015-02-27 15.50.132015-03-09 08.20.572015-03-09 08.47.082015-03-09 08.46.44 IMG_20150309_081903

For more info on this project click here!

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Dear Intern, …

When I applied for my first internship, I do remember going out of my way to make an impression at the company I had applied to. I wrote a letter of intent, explaining why this company and how I was seeing myself possibly contributing. (And of course I followed the basics: portfolio as a pdf less than 5mb, with best works only.)

Considering the sheer amount of architectural interns that rush out into the world of ‘professional’ experience, I would assume that a single look at the competition for an internship would make every single one of them go the extra mile, even two… But instead reality is full of surprises and every six month the inbox gets flooded with mails addressed to the general public of architects with “Dear Sir/Dear Madam” and the expectation that phrases like “your esteemed firm” would actually go any distance. More over the lack of grammatical or narrative skills, presentation talent nor respect makes me want to just keep the team we are in the office and not take any trainees.

I do not appreciate to be called ‘Dude’ over chat by an prospective intern. Anyway why the heck are your applying via chat. I also do not really want to download all the 26 individual pages you have attached to your mail.

Until last year I took the time and replied to the worst applications and tried to explain them, what all went wrong in their approach, but I quickly gave up, as the numbers of bad applications increased dramatically.

So what is it that I would like to see? Well it would be a good start, if your mail is written to me only, because that would show some form of dedication towards your planned work with us. And when I say to me only, I mean no CC, no BCC, no mass-mail, where you copy and paste rather bluntly every architects mail-id you can get your hands on, foremost no “Dear Sir/Dear Madam”. If you want to work with us, you should have taken the time to go through our website and then figured out, if the person your are writing to is male or female (hint: the mail-id can also be a reasonably good indicator for the gender). And then once you’ve done that, don’t write me an anonymous application without any character. Please let me know who you are, what your interests are, what is your background. Don’t write what you think I would like to hear. (There is no point in even attempting that.) Well, and if I am honest, I don’t even care what school your from, what semester your in or how many trophies you’ve won in college. Of course there are basic skills you should have, like software, but none of them can’t be learned with a bit of serious commitment. Anyway the actual job of an architect includes such a vast spectrum of jobs, that if you are keen, there is something for you.  All that matters for a great experience for you and us during your internship is, if we get along. Do we aspire for similar things, does the work we do interest you, why do want to be an architect? These are the information that will help you to stand out and us to determine if we are compatible or not. One last thing, and I mentioned it in the beginning, your portfolio should be representing your skill set. It is not a record of what you have done, but the showcase of your best work. If you fill your portfolio with 200 plans, pictures and sketches, no-one will understand what you are trying to show. And please consider if you really want to show your sketching talent, your photography skills or your your other extra curricular activity that just tries way to hard to sell you as a creative person.

Keep it simple. Show your best work, even if it is little. Remember you are a student and no-one expects a full portfolio yet. And just show that you are actually interested…

If you still want to read more about this topic, here’s another interesting article:

Dear Intern, …

Dear Intern, …

When I applied for my first internship, I do remember going out of my way to make an impression at the company I had applied to. I wrote a letter of intent, explaining why this company and how I was seeing myself possibly contributing. (And of course I followed the basics: portfolio as a pdf less than 5mb, with best works only.)

Considering the sheer amount of architectural interns that rush out into the world of ‘professional’ experience, I would assume that a single look at the competition for an internship would make every single one of them go the extra mile, even two… But instead reality is full of surprises and every six month the inbox gets flooded with mails addressed to the general public of architects with “Dear Sir/Dear Madam” and the expectation that phrases like “your esteemed firm” would actually go any distance. More over the lack of grammatical or narrative skills, presentation talent nor respect makes me want to just keep the team we are in the office and not take any trainees.

I do not appreciate to be called ‘Dude’ over chat by an prospective intern. Anyway why the heck are your applying via chat. I also do not really want to download all the 26 individual pages you have attached to your mail.

Until last year I took the time and replied to the worst applications and tried to explain them, what all went wrong in their approach, but I quickly gave up, as the numbers of bad applications increased dramatically.

So what is it that I would like to see? Well it would be a good start, if your mail is written to me only, because that would show some form of dedication towards your planned work with us. And when I say to me only, I mean no CC, no BCC, no mass-mail, where you copy and paste rather bluntly every architects mail-id you can get your hands on, foremost no “Dear Sir/Dear Madam”. If you want to work with us, you should have taken the time to go through our website and then figured out, if the person your are writing to is male or female (hint: the mail-id can also be a reasonably good indicator for the gender). And then once you’ve done that, don’t write me an anonymous application without any character. Please let me know who you are, what your interests are, what is your background. Don’t write what you think I would like to hear. (There is no point in even attempting that.) Well, and if I am honest, I don’t even care what school your from, what semester your in or how many trophies you’ve won in college. Of course there are basic skills you should have, like software, but none of them can’t be learned with a bit of serious commitment. Anyway the actual job of an architect includes such a vast spectrum of jobs, that if you are keen, there is something for you.  All that matters for a great experience for you and us during your internship is, if we get along. Do we aspire for similar things, does the work we do interest you, why do want to be an architect? These are the information that will help you to stand out and us to determine if we are compatible or not. One last thing, and I mentioned it in the beginning, your portfolio should be representing your skill set. It is not a record of what you have done, but the showcase of your best work. If you fill your portfolio with 200 plans, pictures and sketches, no-one will understand what you are trying to show. And please consider if you really want to show your sketching talent, your photography skills or your your other extra curricular activity that just tries way to hard to sell you as a creative person.

Keep it simple. Show your best work, even if it is little. Remember you are a student and no-one expects a full portfolio yet. And just show that you are actually interested…

If you still want to read more about this topic, here’s another interesting article:

Dear Intern, …

A different angle

Sometimes there are situations in my life, that frustrate me to the core. Like the one just recently, when I was about to rush for lunch, as usual already 5 minutes late for my lunch meeting, and that was, because I can’t stop working once I am in a good flow, not because I am generally late. The bike started at about the fifteenth kick, when I realised that the tyre was punctured. So I took a deep breath, closed my eyes for a few seconds and remained calm. I knew I have a cycle standing over there, so there wasn’t really any problem. So with a bit more frenzy I unlocked the bike; and surely it wasn’t very smooth. We all know how easy it is to fit the key in when you are in a rush, like when you reach home, and all that’s between you and the more than urgent relief of the bathroom is the freaking door lock. Funnily I was thinking about it while trying to unlock the thing.  So I brushed off the dust from the seat just to remember that I had forgotten that last week’s puncture in the cycle was still waiting to get repaired.

Path in Auroville

So whatever… With a large portion of self-doubt I started to walk. Which was great, because my thoughts dangerously close to spinning around the topic of my failure, I quickly got distracted by nature. I started to wonder, why I actually do not walk more often. It gave me a complete new angle of the route that I have browsed by so many times before, hardly paying any attention to more than the traffic. And yes I do enjoy the comfort of a bike, reaching places quickly without the sweaty shirt sticking to my back, but the quality of that walk was something that reminded me of the trekking of my childhood.

Nature has never failed to amaze me. It goes to the extent of moments where there is a huge spider creeping in and about the house at night and you would see me staring at it with a respectful distance, with one hand reaching for the camera, trying to get as close as my inner revulsion would allow me.

Solifugae
Camel Spider
Indian Red Scorpion
Indian Red Scorpion

But this time it was slightly different. This time I felt bad about myself. 

And being a hypocrite sometimes, I felt even worse about all the people brushing by with a huge cloud of dust trailing behind them. Because all the leaves of these little bushes, the newly grown shrubs and of course the all other plants on the road side were covered in red dust, which seemed to suffocate them. Looking at these leaves hanging weakly and knowing that the last rain has been more than a month ago, I felt bad that we, I, make it even more challenging for these plants by blowing dust into their “thirsty faces”.

Red Greenery

Next time I do take the bike, and frankly I wont stop using it, I will drive at a speed that wont produce a cloud of dust behind me… I’ll try, promise!

I learn every day…

UNI
Yesterday a friend asked me, if I was ready to be an architect when I finished architecture school. And I had to give it little thought to give her a straight answer; NO!
Architecture school surely taught me the theories of architecture design, it’s social impacts and importance, the basics of structural engineering and service planning, even the administrative part of the running of an architectural practice, documentation processes, legal groundwork and of course much much more…
Looking back, I am really happy about my studies. Berlin was not only a great city to be in, but the Technical University was a great place to study, with great professors that really tried as much as it was possible to give us field experience through their selection of project work and through their sharing and involvement.
But a few things, maybe they can’t be taught in a university set-up, one will only learn out there practicing architecture.
That also was divided in two different levels of learning for me.
Again still feeling lucky about it, I have worked in large firms, where the in-house policies require you to be organised, your work to be standardized (like drawing standards and styles, presentations etc.) and of course to function in a large team, understanding and respecting hierarchy. I also had some experience working in smaller set-ups. There the work might have been less standardized, but the spectrum of work was endless, compared to the larger companies, where functions are clearly separated. In a smaller set-up I was involved in client interaction, designing, planning and site supervision. And I learned a great deal about architecture there. From a practical point I would even go as far as saying I learned more then anywhere else so far (thanks Fabian).
But then I started on my own. The first time you interact with a client all by yourself, no boss there who can and will cover for you; the first time on site something goes wrong, without the boss who ultimately takes all the responsibility away from you. Suddenly the clients wishes, his budget, his fears, his misunderstandings and in some cases even his lunacy become yours only to deal with! You are in charge. How much is a square foot of polished Kadappa stone flooring? What option do we have for this pergola? Can we build this at 2500 Rs (approx. 30€) a square foot? Are you sure this will work? And sometimes it simply gets tough to go through the fifth round of explanation or selection process. But to be honest, sometimes these questions get to you; sometimes you get hit by a doubt, and you go home and you can’t sleep until you check it the 15th time, until you eradicated that little voice in your head, that keeps asking, “Are you sure?”.
These moments are exactly what one can not be prepared for. Moments when you get a streak of grey hair over night, metaphorically speaking.

I am looking forward to continue to be an architect, as the few things I have to look back to in my only beginning career are all positive. Every pressing deadline, every mistake has turned out to be either a great practice for organisation skills or simply a huge learning opportunity.

So here’s to more design chances, BOQ’s, structural drawings, 3D-visualizations and for most of all, more new people to meet and grow close to, because I guess that’s what architecture really does, it brings people together. Cheers!

The beauty of printed plans

set of working drawings
set of working drawings

A set of working drawings, ready for the site…

How beautiful can printed plans look? Not only that neat plans are loaded with a graceful aesthetic appeal, they also represent our approach towards design. They are the language spoken to transform a vision into manifested reality. They are the mirror of our own aesthetic values. They are in a way the link between “venustas” and “utilitas” (and ideally result in “firmitas”).
It makes us feel good to have created something. The creation comes to life in form of matter the first time when it is printed, when it becomes hardware, and when it leaves the virtual space of a cad-file and can actually be touched. And when it comes to working drawings it also represents the end of an era. The end of nights and days, weeks of design process, revisions and changes and options. They are the result of a long, sometime tedious, sometimes enlightening process of decision making. I can’t help it but to feel that it has a romantic notion in it…

Ormakalum Swapnangalum

Ormakalum Swapnangalum

A scene from a feature film Michael played in.

Here the article in the hindu.

Here the very frist trailer.